For Everyone
Who Loves Edinburgh

Volunteer

The Cockburn Association is a voluntary organisation and we involve volunteers in every aspect of our work. Around 50 people regularly volunteer for the Cockburn in a wide range of roles, including but not restricted to, serving on our committees and assisting with events and publications.

Why volunteer with The Cockburn Association?

Apart from wanting to work with others to protect and enhance the City of Edinburgh for future generations, people are inspired and motivated to help us for different reasons:

Students: work experience or a course placement
Between jobs: some time to spare before starting a new job
Retirement: making good use of years of expertise
Special interest: you may be interested in architecture, conservation, transport or urban design or perhaps the condition of the Capital's pavements and green spaces!

We are currently looking for volunteers to assist with the following tasks:

Events: The Cockburn Association organises a number of events during the year and we are in the process of forming an events working group to assist the office. Tasks will include devising a theme and programme of events each year ranging from "hard hat" tours of new developments to guest lectures. We are looking for creative volunteers interested in architecture, conservation and local history. Previous experience of organising event programmes and/or volunteering advantageous. 
To apply for any of the opportunities above please complete a volunteer form here or contact the Director, Marion Williams.

Committee Opportunities: There are currently no vacancies on the standing committees. If you have expertise in the fields of planning, engineering, conservation or transport and would like to join the Cases Committee or Transport and Planning Committee, when a vacancy arises, please contact the Director, Marion Williams.

Please note all committee volunteers must be members of the Association.

There are few who, when they hear of something horrible... say, listlessly, that it is 'very wrong', and a 'great pity', and that they 'wonder why it is submitted to' and 'surely somebody will interfere'; and then they cast the matter from them, and can never be made to stir a finger about it. Meanwhile, the mischief proceeds. Lord Cockburn, 1849